Rosicrucian Writings Online


THE
THOUGHT OF THE MONTH
 
QUICKENING NATURE
 
By THE IMPERATOR
[H. Spencer Lewis]

 
[From The Rosicrucian Digest April 1937]
 
 
"Rise up, my love, my fair one, and come away. For, lo, the winter is past, the rain is over and gone; the flowers appear on the earth; the time of the singing of birds is come, and the voice of the turtle is heard in our land." (Song of Solomon II, 10-12.)
 
 
HOW beautiful is the springtime; what hope and promise does it not bring! When life removes the mask of tragedy she reveals a countenance radiant with love and joy and beauty. All nature teaches us to rejoice. We are witnessing a new birth in nature, in the incarnation of trees and flowers--a new promise.
 
Life is forever encouraging us. The fact that life is encouraging proves that the universe is friendly. Friendly? You query in astonishment as you think of the revolution in Spain, concentration camps in Germany, militant dictators in Italy and Russia, starving millions in China and India. Yes, I repeat, the universe is friendly because it is ours to master. It can be mastered. The laws that govern it are immutable. The response is invariable. It is like a beautiful high-powered car or piece of intricate equipment that will give us wonderful service when once we have learned to work it properly and care for it adequately. It is like our bodies. What supreme joy a beautiful, supple, healthy body can give us. But what knowledge and effort are required to cultivate and maintain grace, vigor, and strength. The world is more than a mere machine. It is a part of beauty and a source of joy and inspiration forever. In the words of Goethe, it is the garment of the living God woven upon the loom of time. At nature's broad breast the artist, the poet, the scientist, find perpetual nourishment. She soothes the weary and disconsolate; she heals the sick; she provides a living stage and background for life's panorama.
 
The foremost gift of life is that the law of love is the supreme law in the universe. There is nothing more glorious in the world than love. Because love exists, life is always worth living. Love is transfiguring. The most menial chores become sublime when love sets the task. The mother, wrapped in love for her child, forgets the hours of back-breaking toil. Love has prompted every achievement, every heroic deed. He who has not experienced love is poor indeed. What matter is the poverty of the present! What matter the trials and tribulations of the past. Love like the rainbow of light casts beauty over all.
 
The love of David and Jonathan has become immortal in literature. For fourteen years did Jacob serve Laban for his daughter Rachel. Emily Sedgwick waited twenty years for the poet, Tennyson. Charles Lamb, the great English essayist, devoted his life to his sister, Mary, when she became subject to attacks of insanity. Interest brightens the eye when we hear the names of Romeo and Juliet, Tristan and Isolde, Paolo and Francesca--famous lovers of the world. Love! "Ah, sweet mystery of life, at last I've found thee. . . . .  'Tis love and love alone the world is seeking." It costs no money. It cannot be commanded. It is an attribute of God. When life has such a glorious gift to bestow, can it ever lose its zest and glamour? This gift that is free for the asking--is anyone deprived of it? No, my friends. You have only to open your hearts and God will pour so mighty a stream through you that you will touch Heaven's heights in the divinest bliss and ecstacy. We need not sigh for love's young dream because friendship may be ours for the seeking. It may be a very trite remark to make, but a great friendship is achieved, not won like a prize in a lottery. I speak of the joys that all may attain.
 
Even more sublime than love of friends is the love that one pours out into service for the world. It is the love that you, yourself, experience, not the love of which you are the recipient, that transforms your personality. As Sara Teasdale, our American poet, has so aptly put it:
 
"What do I owe to you,
Who loved me deep and long?
Who never gave my spirit wings
Nor gave my heart a song.
 
"But, Oh, to him I loved,
Who loved me not at all,
I owe the little gate
That led through Heaven's wall."
 
Each and every one of us lacking love in life can find a lonely, frustrated soul on whom to pour our love unstintingly, god-like, without thought of return or recompense. Do not for a moment think that your love is lost. He who loves divinely has made God his debtor. What greater prize can the universe offer? Each and every one of us can find a task, a cause to serve in high dedication of the soul--to serve because we want to, because we believe in it, because we want to be one stone in the construction of the temple, one more soldier in the glorious army of our dreams.
 
In this glorious season I do want, with all my heart, to share with you the love and joy that fills my being. I want you to feel your hearts lighter, your souls at peace, your desire for life stronger, your determination to do and dare firmer, your confidence in yourselves and in the work of our beloved Order unshaken. In the Bhagavad Gita, Krishna says to the trembling Arjuna, shrinking from the battle fray, "Why do you fear? The victory is yours. Enter and fight."
 
It is said that the darkest hour is just before the dawn. You may be standing at that very turning point in your lives. Your faces are toward the West and it is very dark. All that you see are the storms of the winter that is past. Just turn around and face the East and the light of the rising sun may almost blind you with its glory. Hope triumphant may be in the offing. The lords of life may be standing at the very portal bearing gifts of love and peace and joy--gifts that are the culmination of your own efforts, thoughts, and desires and dreams. Tomorrow may bring the fulfillment of your destiny.
 

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